Residual stress makes hybrids more durable

Figure 1: Turning induces residual stresses in components – for example in magnesium screws for use in medical applications. (Photo: Patrick Helmecke)

IFW | Where steel is too heavy and aluminium too soft, the future is a combination of both materials. The lifespan of hybrids depends on the residual stresses induced by the final machining process. The goal of IFW scientists is to control these residual stresses.

Planing, turning, milling: After forming, nearly every component needs to be machined, affecting properties, such as wear resistance and lifetime. The machining process can induce residual stresses in the component, with the result that for example minor cracks close on their own and make the component more durable.
Within the scope of the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1153, the Institute of Production Engineering and Machine Tools (IFW) is focusing on the formation and modification of such residual stresses. The aim is to improve the properties of a hybrid’s individual materials and to investigate the residual stresses in the area of material transition between the two different materials. The residual stresses shall then be influenced in a controlled manner to increase the bond quality between steel and aluminium.

by Rolf Hockauf

Image gallery for this article

  • Figure 1: Turning induces residual stresses in components – for example in magnesium screws for use in medical applications. (Photo: Patrick Helmecke)
  • Figure 2: Turning tool affecting the area of material transition of the hybrid material compound (Graphic: Rolf Hockauf)
  • Figure 3: Preliminary tests in the area of material transition of a friction-welded compound made of two steels (Graphic: Rolf Hockauf)
  • Figure 4: Schematic diagram of component development steps today and in future (Graphic: Rolf Hockauf)
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