Experiments for simulating wet welding under water

During wet welding of steel plates, thermocouples measure the temperature in the heat-affected zone. (Photo: Jan Klett/IW)

IW | Repair work carried out at offshore wind turbines poses new challenges: Researchers of the Institute of Materials Science (IW) generate data to make the finite element method also usable for the simulation of wet underwater welding.

In the course of energy transition, offshore wind turbines play an ever-increasing role. However, repair work done at offshore plants poses a problem: To ensure a life expectancy of 25 years, engineers increasingly use higher-strength steels. The disadvantage: Today's steels cannot be welded under water when repair is needed.

For this reason, the researchers' aim is to provide the fundamentals for simulating the complex conditions of materials during wet underwater welding numerically. Research at IW comprises welding tests as well as quenching tests carried out under water after a heat treatment, in order to characterize heat transfer and phase transformation kinematics of wet welding processes. At the Chair of Materials Science of Universität Rostock, the results are used to create an FE model - a software solution for the benefit of designers in on- and offshore industry.

by Jan Klett

Image gallery for this article

  • During wet welding of steel plates, thermocouples measure the temperature in the heat-affected zone. (Photo: Jan Klett/IW)
  • Macrograph of a weld with five bores for thermocouples. (Photo: Chair of Materials Science; Universität Rostock)
  • The Continuous Time Temperature Transformation diagram for welding shows the curves for steel grade S430GP. (Photo: Chair of Materials Science; Universität Rostock)
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